New Irish language music aims to highlight refugee experiences through the eyes of a child

Contemporary Irish language music and film creator, Deoraí, has released a new single ‘Páiste Bocht’ (‘Poor Child’) which aims to figuratively portray the experience of a refugee arriving in Ireland and entering into a new world full of different colours, smells and unfamiliar sounds.

The song is written and produced by Deoraí who has become a household name in the Irish-speaking community with his artistic approach to music.

‘Páiste Bocht’ that looks set to bring his art to wider audiences, in part as an examination of the refugee process across the world.

Deoraí (exile) is an art project that creates original music and film and although both Irish and English are used in the project’s content, there is a special emphasis placed on original songs in the Irish language.

The track figuratively explores Ireland’s relationship with refugees and is directed and produced by Gerard Walsh and features a perspective from the point of view of a child in an astronaut suit.

This new project aims to change the way people think about the Irish language, about music and about music videos.

Véarsa 1
Teach solais romhat
An cladach bán
Agus mairfidh tú
‘Feadh oíche eile, ‘pháiste.
Tá d’éidí fliúch
Tá do lámha brúite
Ach is léir an dóchas
Ar aghaidh do thuistí.

Cór
A pháiste bocht
Tá tuirse ort
‘S fuil ar do chos
Tá an talamh tirim.
Beidh tú slán anocht
Beidh bia is uisce agat
Níl ort a’ locht
Tá na tonnta imithe.

Véarsa 2
Amach anseo
Ní bheidh pléascaí ann
Agus fuaim an ghunna
In imigéin a leanbh.
‘Sé do thalamh nua
Tar éis turas fada
Is trua liom nach bhfuil
Na mílte fáilte romhaibh.

Cór
-Críoch-

‘Sceimhlitheoir’ is an Electro-Horror music and film piece in the Irish language also by Deoraí

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I'm a freelance content creator and a journalist who has a strong desire to do as much as possible in the time I've got left on this planet. I got a taste for storytelling when I interned in Storyful many moons ago and since then have worked for places like WorldIrish (now Irish Central), Her.ie and Lonely Planet. I am constantly curious.

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